Long Live Dogecoin: Why Developers Won’t Let the Joke Currency Die

‘Such crypto. Very currency. Wow.’

So went the enthusiastic, disjointed dialogue of the ‘Doge’, the cute Shiba Inu dog turned internet meme that was later adopted by cryptocurrency users in search of a less serious twist on the tech.

From 2013 to 2014, dogecoin carved its place in the crypto world, in part because its community used it more as a currency at a time when rivals bitcoin and litecoin were typically held as (serious) assets. At its height, hundreds or thousands of dogecoins would zip around Twitter and Reddit, sent back and forth between users who collectively dubbed themselves ‘shibes’.

That momentum then expanded out into more serious endeavors, with the community raising money to fund a bobsled team and water wells in developing countries, among other charitable initiatives.

But as the cryptocurrency protocol closes on 18 months without an upgrade, is the fun-loving dogecoin finally dying? And what does dying even mean for a distributed software currency?

According to Jackson Palmer, the cryptocurrency’s founder (who departed the community amidst growing acrimony in 2015), dogecoin has seen a broad decline on the development side – a state of affairs that doesn’t bode well for its longevity.

Palmer, who continues to maintain his distance although he checks in on the parody currency every so often,

Read more ... source: CoinDesk

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